Living Iram-inal Designs

Published on January 27th, 2010 | by Talancia Pea

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Eco-Friendly Jewelry Designs a “Sister Act”

Iram-inal Designs

Editor’s note:  We don’t sell iram-inal designs in the sustainablog Green Choices store… just thought this was a great story! Might have to look into listing these products…

Mari and Lani (Malene) Davis were once two little girls with a simple dream: to create “delicious designs” for sustainable jewelry from items that most people would regard as trash. They knew it would be a challenge to carve a place in the niche market of earth-friendly designers and convince the masses that trash could be beautiful, trendy and fashionable jewelry.

Nevertheless, the sisters pursued their dreams and launched iram-inal designs (“iram-inal” is the sisters’ names spelled backwards) in 2007. They, along with their team, began handcrafting necklaces, earrings, pendants and rings from mostly recycled and repurposed materials.

Eco-friendly jewelry, unique materials

Initially Mari and Lani only used semi-precious stones in their designs but felt compelled to do more to be help the environment. So the sisters began implementing recycled wood beads from FSC certified forests in their Green collection. The idea was a hit with Iram-inal’s customers and a springboard for new designs.

The designers’ newest creation is the SL fabric collection, which are necklaces made from upcycled and recycled jersey cotton tee shirts. The line got its name from a design team member and friend Shannon Lynette, who also designs her own line of apparel. The designers also use old hardware parts, like nuts, bolts and washers, to create their Ear Candy and Handcasted collections of earrings and rings.

All of iram-inal’s “chunky, funky and always fresh” jewelry designs are affordable for any budget, with each jewelry piece costing under $100. If you are a bargain shopper, now is the time to snatch iram-inal’s designs at discount prices during the New Year’s Sale at their website. Every day new items will be added to the sale section of the website.

Iram-inal’s designs are also sold in retail locations throughout the country; you can learn how to create your own one-of-a-kind jewelry by contacting Mari and Lani to request hosting an iram-inal designs jewelry party with your friends.

Talancia Pea is a freelance green style writer based in St. Louis, Missouri

Photo credit: iram-inal designs



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About the Author

Sustainable Fashion Blogger since 2008 with work featured in magazines and newspapers, among other publications. Find her on .



  • Pingback: Eco-Friendly Jewelry Designs a “Sister Act” « Your Green Ability

  • http://www.onlinejewelerreview.com/ Best Online Jewelers

    Great post. I think most people don’t bother to wonder how much damage is done to the earth in order to create one little ring or piece of jewelry. I really hope that jewelers such as iram-inal set the standard for the jewelry industry and consumers start to demand products that are sourced using “green” methods.

  • LaQuinta Shelvin

    This is an awesome post… gave me inspiration to save the earth in a new, less tradtional way…=)

  • Pingback: Eco-Friendly Jewelry Designers Mari and Lani Davis | Sustainablog

  • Cote

    Great post! I wish everybody would care about earth. I found that http://www.nutivory.com provide the women aware of the environment a fashion-forward, eco-friendly alternative too. Their products include beautiful handmade necklaces, earrings and accessories made from tagua also called vegetable ivory or ivory nut. These nuts are found in the Amazon and no harm to the environment is done. They also combine environmental awareness with support to communities and poor families.

  • http://Web Angel

    Great story!! I admire a brand that is conscious enough about our environment to care about their carbon footprint. I recently found this site offering 100% recycled 14kt gold and sterling silver jewerly…https://www.amaragold.com/ LOVE their product!!

  • Pingback: Jes MaHarry Jewelry: Good for the Planet, Charities | Sustainablog

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