Science google earth rising temperatures

Published on February 4th, 2014 | by Guest Author

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Google Earth Maps Global Warming at the Local Level

We greenies are very careful about making claims about climate change in any particular location. Global warming is global; the rising temperatures referred to in the scientific literature are averaged out worldwide. Additionally, we really don’t want to give any ammunition to “skeptics” hollering about Winter weather in their location

But can we measure the impact of climate change at the local level? Yes… and, as Skeptical Science/The Guardian revealed today, Google Earth now features a layer that lets you see global warming at the micro level. Developed by the East Anglia Climatic Research Unit, this layer will no doubt provide yet another way to spend hours on Google Earth (and – sigh – probably get the deniers trying to resurrect the rotten, stinking corpse of “ClimateGate”… whatever).

Play around with this new layer, and let us know what you think.

Google Earth: how much has global warming raised temperatures near you? (via Skeptical Science)

Posted on 4 February 2014 by dana1981 The University of East Anglia has teamed up with Google to make surface temperature data easily accessible. If you’ve ever wondered how much global warming has raised local temperatures in your area or elsewhere…



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2 Responses to Google Earth Maps Global Warming at the Local Level

  1. John says:

    Your comment “and – sigh – probably get the deniers trying to resurrect the rotten, stinking corpse of “ClimateGate”… whatever” reflects a 2 dimensional understanding of a very complex problem. YES, our actions are having an effect on the climate. AND YES, there are those trying to profit off of our fear AND YES, even Climate Science suffers from the same good-ole-boys club trying to manipulate the world for its own ends.

    Before people start decrying me as a climate change denier, I want you to go re-read the last paragraph and the first point I made. Yes, we are responsible for massive climate changes on the planet. Mostly because we have lost appreciation and respect for the sacredness of that which surrounds us.

    People with a survival-at-all-costs mentality (such as the 1% who see the loss of any of their accumulated wealth as a hit on their survival) or those who see anything that poses a potential health risk as being another evil to be overcome (which describes a lot of greenies) are still operating out of the same failed paradigm:

    THEY ARE TERRIFIED OF DEATH AND CHANGE, both of which are essential parts of life. Consequently, they take up the manicheistic view that life is composed of GOOD and BAD, both of which are defined based on their fear of change and their notion that they are entitled to a life where they have no pain, no challenges, no obstacles. This notion is a fantasy world from the perspective of any of the world’s wisdom traditions. “Death — bad. Life — good” is an expression of not being connected to life in the deepest sense of the word.

    The truth is that “the evil right” and “the beneficent left” have a lot more in common than you think. Until you start speaking to that and acknowledging the true complexity of the issue we will continue to be locked in a state of endless, infantile war.

  2. Pingback: Time to Stop Living Dangerously and Move Beyond Coal | Sustainablog

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