Author Archives: Earth Policy Institute

World Solar Power Topped 100,000 Megawatts in 2012

August 1st, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

The world installed 31,100 megawatts of solar photovoltaics (PV) in 2012—an all-time annual high that pushed global PV capacity above 100,000 megawatts. There is now enough PV operating to meet the household electricity needs of nearly 70 million people at the European level of use.


Fossil Fuel Use Pushes Carbon Dioxide Emissions into Dangerous Territory

July 24th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

Since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels have grown exponentially. Despite wide agreement by governments on the need to limit emissions, the rate of increase ratcheted up from less than 1 percent each year in the 1990s to almost 3 percent annually in the first decade of this century


Peak Water: What Happens When the Wells Go Dry?

July 9th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

Aquifer depletion now threatens harvests in China, India, and the United States. These big three grain producers together supply half of the world's grain harvest. The question is not whether water shortages will affect future harvests in these countries, but rather when they will do so


Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 4. Food or Fuel?

July 3rd, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

The massive diversion of grain to fuel cars has helped drive up food prices, leaving low-income consumers everywhere to suffer some of the most severe food price inflation in history. As of mid-2012, world wheat, corn, and soybean prices were roughly double their historical levels


Full Planet, Empty Plates, Chapter 5: Eroding Soils Darkening Our Future

June 26th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

The thin layer of topsoil that covers the earth’s land surface was formed over long stretches of geological time as new soil formation exceeded the natural rate of erosion. Sometime within the last century, soil erosion began to exceed new soil formation. Now, nearly a third of the world’s cropland is losing topsoil faster than new soil is forming, reducing the land’s inherent fertility. Soil that was formed on a geological time scale is being lost on a human time scale


Farmed Fish Production Overtakes Beef

June 13th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

The world quietly reached a milestone in the evolution of the human diet in 2011. For the first time in modern history, world farmed fish production topped beef production. The gap widened in 2012, with output from fish farming—also called aquaculture—reaching a record 66 million tons, compared with production of beef at 63 million tons. And 2013 may well be the first year that people eat more fish raised on farms than caught in the wild.


China’s Growing Hunger for Meat Shown by Move to Buy Smithfield, World’s Leading Pork Producer

June 6th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

Pork is by far China’s favorite protein, which helps to explain the late-May announced acquisition of U.S. meat giant Smithfield Foods Inc., the world’s leading pork producer, by the Chinese company Shuanghui International, owner of China’s largest meat processor. China already buys more than 60 percent of the world’s soybean exports to feed to its own livestock and has been a net importer of pork for the last five years. Now the move for Chinese companies is to purchase both foreign agricultural land and food-producing companies outright


Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

May 9th, 2013 | by Earth Policy Institute

Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped up, as we added another billion every 13 years or so until we hit 7 billion in late



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