Browsing the "Community" Tag

Harvesting Justice 19: “The Revolution is Going to be Fought With The Hoe”- Agriculture and Environment in New Mexico

June 25th, 2013 | by Guest Author

Miguel Santistevan and his partner Margarita García are helping youth reclaim knowledge about traditions behind lands and waters. Sol Feliz Farm, Miguel’s grandfather’s house east of Taos, is an acre of spiral gardens, rock gardens, and straight rows. The farm’s Agriculture Implementation Research and Education (AIRE) project is capturing the imagination of an impassioned group of youth in northern New Mexico


Top Five US Cities for Urban Homesteading

May 28th, 2013 | by Guest Author

Where do urban homesteaders live? Where are they gathering? Using the Gallup Wellbeing Index as a jumping off point, here are the top five cities for happy homesteading


Harvesting Justice 13: We Have a Dream – Farm Workers Organize for Justice

May 7th, 2013 | by Guest Author

For decades, farmworkers – the more than one million men and women who work in fields and orchards around the country – have been leading a struggle for justice in our food system. They have been building awareness and mobilizing the public, successfully securing some rights, higher wages, and better working conditions.


Harvesting Justice 9: Farmers and Consumers vs. Monsanto – David Meets Goliath

April 9th, 2013 | by Guest Author

Via Campesina, the world’s largest confederation of farmers with member organizations in 70 countries, has called Monsanto one of the “principal enemies of peasant sustainable agriculture and food sovereignty for all peoples.” See how peasant farmers, and the activists who support them, are challenging the agribusiness giant's incursions into developing world farming


Harvesting Justice #4: Women's Work – Gender and the Global Food System

March 4th, 2013 | by Guest Author

Women produce 60 to 80 percent of all food, both as subsistence farmers and as agricultural wage laborers. They are the primary providers for the majority of the world’s 925 million hungry people, obtaining food, collecting firewood and water, and cooking. And yet they have less access to land and the resources necessary to grow on it than their male counterparts. Inequitable distribution of land, labor, and resources leaves farming women triply burdened by work: in the fields, in the home, and in society



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