Browsing the "Recycling" Tag

Come Hang with sustainablog to Discuss Recycling

November 14th, 2012 | by Jeff McIntire-Strasburg

Did you know that tomorrow, November 15, is America Recycles Day? That's OK if you didn't - this one hasn't quite reached the status of Earth Day. But it could, as most of us almost automatically associate "environmental action" with "recycling." Is that a good thing? Let's discuss


Beyond Recycling: On the Road to Zero Waste

November 12th, 2012 | by Guest Author

Zero waste strategies help societies to produce and consume goods while respecting ecological limits and the rights of communities. The strategies ensure that all discarded materials are safely and sustainably returned to nature or to manufacturing in place of raw materials. In a zero waste approach, waste management is not left only to politicians and technical experts; rather, everyone impacted—from residents of wealthy neighborhoods to the public, private, and informal sector workers who handle waste—has a voice


San Francisco: Zero Waste by 2020?

November 8th, 2012 | by Guest Author

San Francisco has established itself as a global leader in waste management by diverting 77% of its waste away from landfills and incinerators. The city has achieved its national distinction through a three-pronged approach: enacting strong waste reduction legislation, partnering with a like-minded waste management company to innovate new programs, and creating a culture of recycling and composting


We Can Reforest the Earth

July 31st, 2012 | by Earth Policy Institute

Protecting the 10 billion acres of remaining forests on earth and replanting many of those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health


Throwaway Economy Headed for Junk Heap of History

July 13th, 2012 | by Earth Policy Institute

In their book Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, American architect William McDonough and German chemist Michael Braungart conclude that waste and pollution are to be avoided entirely. “Pollution,” says McDonough, “is a symbol of design failure.” The challenge is to re-evaluate the materials we consume and the way we manufacture products so as to cut down on waste.



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