Browsing the "Sustainability" Tag

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Celebrating Sustainability Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges & Universities

I was an assistant professor at an historically Black university (or an HBCU) back when I started sustainablog in 2003. As such, I’ve always had an interest in sustainability initiatives at these schools. Unfortunately, HBCUs tend to get overlooked when it comes time to put together those lists of top sustainability institutions. While some may […]

Sustainability in Israel: The Present and the Future

Israel, a country perhaps best known for its religious heritage and rich history, has quietly been taking steps toward a sustainable future. The country is not large, with an expected population of just 11 million residents by 2030 (from 8 million nowadays), but it faces some extreme challenges in terms of sustainability.

November 10th

Harvesting Justice #4: Women's Work – Gender and the Global Food System

Women produce 60 to 80 percent of all food, both as subsistence farmers and as agricultural wage laborers. They are the primary providers for the majority of the world’s 925 million hungry people, obtaining food, collecting firewood and water, and cooking. And yet they have less access to land and the resources necessary to grow on it than their male counterparts. Inequitable distribution of land, labor, and resources leaves farming women triply burdened by work: in the fields, in the home, and in society.

March 4th

Harvesting Justice #2: Think Globally, Eat Locally

Food sovereignty is rooted in the daily work of every small farmer, rancher, fisherperson, landless farm worker, and everyone else involved in local food production. Yet no matter what they produce, their ability to survive is affected by international market forces. The movement, therefore, also includes community, national, and international activists working for just trade and economic systems.

February 21st

Bicycle Rental: A Small Step to Going Greener

Cutting down on car emissions and using less fuel are two ways that help us green our lives. Commuting by bicycle is a great way to do this, but what if you live too far from work to make this a feasible option? How can the average person who doesn’t own a bicycle take advantage of all its green benefits? The answer is a bicycle share program, of course. In fact, there may already be a share site in your area.

May 22nd