Freezing Food: The Least Cool (But Most Accessible) Form Of Preservation [Infographic]

So, what have you fermented recently? Sauerkraut’s my thing now – every month or so, I ask my wife to pick me up a head of cabbage to make a new batch. I haven’t canned or dried anything, but I know those are forms of food preservation that others are experimenting with. What about freezing? Well, sure, you may pick up some ice cream or frozen vegetables, but that’s not really a cool preservation method like these others… right?

While it’s not as trendy to discuss in coffee shops and such, freezing food is definitely the most accessible form of food preservation: almost everyone in the developed world has a freezer of some kind. Knowing what to put in that space, and for how long, can serve as an effective tool in your fight against food waste… and it doesn’t take nearly as long to learn! Sure, you have to protect many fresh foods from freezer burn and such, but that’s definitely easier than… well, learning how to make sauerkraut (which, truthfully, is pretty easy, too).

But not everything can be frozen, right? Yes and no. Freezing will definitely affect the quality of some products, but not as many as you might think. The infographic below from AO.com shows a number of food you made not have considered freezing… but, with a little bit of knowledge, you could do so, and get more use out of those ingredients. Wouldn’t you rather keep that cheese, or those mashed potatoes, out of the trash?

This is a relatively short list, so if you’ve got freezing secrets for something else – especially something most people don’t consider freezable – share them with us!

freezing food infographic

An infographic brought to you by AO.com. Open in a new window.

About the Author

Jeff McIntire-Strasburg is the founder and editor of sustainablog. You can keep up with all of his writing at Facebook, and at